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Posts Tagged ‘business’

One week ago, Forbes.com released its annual World’s 100 Most Powerful Women List. Forbes discusses the ranking method on the report’s front page:

Forbes’ Power Women list isn’t about celebrity or popularity; it’s about influence. Queen Rania of Jordan (No. 76), for instance, is perhaps the most listened-to woman in the Middle East; her Twitter feed has 600,000 followers.

In assembling the list, Forbes looked for women who run countries, big companies or influential nonprofits. Their rankings are a combination of two scores: visibility–by press mentions–and the size of the organization or country these women lead.

Forbes also released a video on why Angela Merkel, Sheila Bair, and Indra Nooyi are at the top of the list.

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If you didn’t read this past Monday’s Boston Globe, then you probably didn’t see their wonderful 20th anniversary issue of the Globe 100, a publication where they profile the 100 Best companies in Massachusetts.  Included in this magazine-length section are articles about five local companies that survived downturns and have experienced consistent success, a CEO survey on the economic outlook, Q&A’s with local leaders, rankings of local companies across sectors and different qualities, and profiles of these top companies.  Read the entire special publication online at the Boston Globe website.

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Have you ever worked for a boss who expected you to stick around for a regular 9-5 shift but they seemed to have a very flexible schedule? And would they expect you to explain why it was you needed time off, but would offer no explanation of why they were gone? A recent Deloitte survey addresses this issue and reports that a more transparent and flexible schedule for both leadership and employees would have a positive impact on the work environment. I know it may sound like common sense to some, but it’s a pretty interesting report to read. See the summary of the report at Kiplinger, and read the full report here.  Thanks to Linda Schuller Wolf for hearing a blurb about the report on the radio!

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If you haven’t seen this already (it’s from August 2007), then now’s the time to check out Forbes Magazine’s wonderful report on The World’s 100 Most Powerful Women, available here.

I came across this while looking at the other lists that Forbes has online, which I was browsing thanks to April Dubrow, student worker in the SOM Library.  April forwarded me another of their list, the Forbes Fictional 15, a list lampooning Forbes’ compilation lists.  The Fictional 15 is a compilation of the top fictitious characters.  Check it out here, as well as their list of 25 Largest Fictional Companies, available here.

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I don’t know how I missed this one, but thanks to Megha Bhutani for keying me into Businessweek‘s special report on “Graduating Into a Recession” from last week.  Topics include the job market outlook for recently-graduated MBA students, tips from students who have found jobs during a recession, and how a recession can actually help B-schools.  See the full set of articles here, which are fulltext and free to read.

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Maybe Kermit the Frog was right–that sometimes, it isn’t easy being green.  But with the steady increase of journals and magazines that come across my desk, it looks like the green movement is taking hold and mainstream culture has begun to embrace it.  This week, Newsweek magazine highlighted the green movement in their special section called “Leadership and the Environment”.  I’d highly suggest checking it out–it’s all available online and it features some wonderful articles.  From lessons we could learn about Iceland’s energy policies, to socially responsible business schools, to how the candidates stack up, this issue was certainly a highlight for my week.  See the link here to Newsweek‘s special section on “Leadership and the Environment”.

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Wired has been running a series of posts on business trends of 2008.  The article linked below is about how companies that are going green have to balance the financial concerns of their investors with their environmental products (Toyota is highlighted).  See Wired‘s other 2008 trends on the right-hand column.

Wired 2008 Business Trends

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